A Simple Favor Movie Ending Explained (In Detail)

Spoilers Alert:

“Ghostbusters” director Paul Feig is with us A Simple Favor (2018) directed a stylish, insane thriller with Anna Kendrick and Blake Lively, in which he still remains a rogue. From March 14th it will also be available for home cinema. And on this occasion, in cooperation with STUDIOCANAL Home Entertainment, we are giving away a fan package consisting of the Blu-ray, the novel and a poster for the film. WWhat you have to do to win one of these prizes can be found further down in this posting.

Stephanie Smothers (Anna Kendrick) is a lively, naive single mom who runs her own YouTube channel where she shares recipes, gives parenting and craft tips and chats a little about her life. In addition, the young widow is completely over-motivated, which is why the parents of the other children in her son Miles’ class often tease her behind Stephanie’s back. One afternoon, however, Stephanie meets the always elegantly dressed, determined and harsh Emily (Blake Lively). The wealthy PR manager of a prestigious fashion company will “devour” Stephanie, the remaining parents swear when they realize how quickly Stephanie falls for the snappy, command-dispensing, worldly Emily. She invites her to lunchtime martinis, elicits dark secrets from her and lets the mom vlogger taste the life of the rich. And then one day, Emily asks her new acquaintance for a small favor. She should look after her son for a moment. Afterwards, Emily seems to have disappeared from the face of the earth…

“A Simple Favor” is something like the antithesis of David Fincher’s “Gone Girl” – a clever thriller satire that quotes the genre up and down, while two excellent (and above all excellently dressed!) leading actresses give the best performances of their careers deliver.

 

We reveal how good the result is in our review.

The plot summary

Stephanie Smothers (Anna Kendrick) is a lively, naive single mom who runs her own YouTube channel where she shares recipes, gives parenting and craft tips and chats a little about her life. In addition, the young widow is completely over-motivated, which is why the parents of the other children in her son Miles’ class often tease her behind Stephanie’s back. One afternoon, however, Stephanie meets the always elegantly dressed, determined and harsh Emily (Blake Lively). The wealthy PR manager of a prestigious fashion company will “devour” Stephanie, the remaining parents swear when they realize how quickly Stephanie falls for the snappy, command-dispensing, worldly Emily. She invites her to lunchtime martinis, elicits dark secrets from her and lets the mom vlogger taste the life of the rich. And then one day, Emily asks her new acquaintance for a small favor. She should look after her son for a moment. Afterwards, Emily seems to have disappeared from the face of the earth…

A Simple Favor Movie Meaning & ending

Director Paul Feig is primarily known as a comedy expert. For example, through the multiple award-winning “Brautalarm”, “Taffe Mädels”, the surprise hit “Spy – Susan Cooper Undercover” or the colorful and cheerful “Ghostbusters” , for which he had to endure a lot of malice at the time. However, Feig has chosen a thriller as his latest prank: the adaptation of the Darcey Bell novel “A Simple Favor”. But Paul Feig can’t, or doesn’t want to, completely get out of his skin: Although Feig stages “A Simple Favor” in many ways like a cool thriller of the David Fincher school, he leaves the leading actress Anna Kendrick (“Pitch Perfect 1- 3”) and Blake Lively (“Forever Adaline”) flirt with the absurdity of it all. And how flippantly screenwriter Jessica Sharzer sets up the numerous twists, surprises and revelations that this thriller plot undergoes undoubtedly leans towards the parodic.

 

Stephanie (Anna Kendrick) with her son Miles (Joshua Satine) and Emily’s son Nicky (Ian H).

Paul Feig mixes two formative cinematic influences with an unerring hand to find the style of his clever thriller: With an opening credits inspired by Saul Bass, international evergreens full of attitude and Emily’s spacious, tastefully furnished loft, Feig awakens associations with the distinguished, fashionable thrillers of the 1960s like “Charade”. Meanwhile , composer Theodore Shapiro’s instrumental score (“Hidden Beauty”) mimics the synthetic, icy soundscapes that Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross created for “Gone Girl” and that have been copied many times since David Fincher’s top thriller. However, Shapiro is not a vapid copycat, but rather adds his own flair to his Reznor Ross homage in the instrumentation. In general, “Just a Little Favor” isn’t a twisted “Gone Girl” in terms of content, but it is tonally. While David Fincher’s Gillian Flynn adaptation relies primarily on suspense, but underpins the gripping story with satirical swipes at the media, the US legal system and society’s expectations of married couples, Feig’s film is witty throughout – although the joke comes from the smug dialogue at the beginning and gradually the plot also becomes a source of gags.

Nevertheless, Feig weaves a gripping dramaturgical arc through his presentation and the hooky narrative. This difficult tonal balancing act succeeds primarily because the entire ensemble plays the film material, which becomes increasingly absurd as the running time progresses, with complete naturalness and dead straight. No winks, no sarcasm, just straightforward performances in a completely heightened reality. Anna Kendrick even gives one of the best acting performances of her career. With a wonderful casualness, she lets her character, who satirizes artificially friendly and therefore subtly creepy mommy vloggers, say such pointedly written sentences as: “I will never understand the separation between housewives and businesswomen – you can be friends with both As funny and exaggerated as Stephanie is written, Kendrick grounds her enough that she works as the protagonist in this crazy suspense story. And she sets up Stephanie in such a way that she would be credible as a hero, victim and villain, so that the further course of the story remains unclear.

 

Stephanie and her new friend Emily (Blake Lively) confide their deepest secrets to each other.

When the plot begins to hit hooks almost every five minutes, it is very entertaining due to the sheer exaggeration, but there is still a grain of plausibility, as Stephanie can be trusted to play any of the implied roles in the plot. Blake Lively, meanwhile, is allowed to appear as a cultivated, arrogant, enigmatic woman who inspires envy, amazement and even pity. A real eye-catcher are her impressive costumes, which pay homage to old Hollywood, when women like Marlene Dietrich broke gender roles in pants suits. As clever as the costumes and production design of “A Simple Favor” are, the camera work is unfortunately a bit of a disappointment: Feig and cameraman John Schwartzman (“Legacy of the Secret Book”) illustrate the events in overexposed images, which gives the film a clinical look look, rather than emulating either the style of his 60s inspirations or Fincher’s thrillers on a smaller scale. “A Simple Favor” can only stare enviously at the aesthetics of the comedy thriller “Game Night” . That and the final act, which is either too thick or not thick enough, but ends up in no man’s land in its given form, spoil the overall impression a little. Regardless, Paul Feig’s mischievous thriller is a sleight-of-hand exercise worth seeing, with great acting performances from its two leading actresses and stunning costume design.

Conclusion: “A Simple Favor” is something like the antithesis of David Fincher’s “Gone Girl” – a clever thriller satire that quotes the genre up and down, while two excellent (and above all excellently dressed!) leading actresses give the best performances deliver their career.

“A Simple Favor” can be seen in German cinemas nationwide from November 8th.

 

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